No Longer Looking for a Few Good (Southern) Men

The Commandant of the Marine Corps has decreed that all symbols of the Confederacy be removed from Marine Corps bases. Even, at least, the General class of officers in the Marine Corps has caved to political correctness.

Every time there is a soldier with an eyepatch or missing limb put before the cameras, one’s heart and respect go out to that purple heart recipient. Some people from the past also wonder what kind of leadership is leading. Once there was little doubt in men like Chesty Puller, or Smedly Butler. But any given day now, when some moronic order is issued, well, God help the troops.

Not surprising. Most officers beyond field grade have become no more than political hacks, including, apparently the Commandant.

Really, no surprise.  Marines once advertised they were looking for “A Few Good Men.” That disappeared with nagging Hillary-Women political beggars and cowards fussing and moaning. Now they are “hoping” for a few good men and it looks like hope springs eternal although not longingly at the top.

It is ironic to the nth degree that a quite courageous lady, Elaine Donnelly, has been fighting for the Marine Corps (and all of the military) for years. Here is the irony. In looking for a few good men they got a trooper in Mrs. Donnelly. While only “hoping” for a few good men they got General Berger.

Berger denigrates the finest men who ever took the field of battle—the Confederate Army of the CSA, while trying to be “woke” enough for him insult current Southerners (who have a disproportionately high number to other sections of the county) in the Marine Corps. Go figure.

To General Berger who has issued the order: Would this also include discontinuing the Star-Spangled Banner? After, all it was written by Francis Scott Key, a Southerner and whose grandson was arrested by Abraham Lincoln for his loyalty to the CSA.

Are there are any photos on any base or in any Marine Corps museum of Captain Julian Dusenbury, of Clemson South Carolina raising the first flag, the Confederate Battle Flag, after the surrender of the Japanese at Okinawa. Will you have those removed General?

Will the name of General Lewis B. (Chesty) Puller be removed in any circumstance where his comments are recorded on any base as to his pride in the South and the CSA courage and devotion of its men?

Should those two Southern men, Harlon Block or Franklin Sousley be removed from all Mt. Suribachi. Iwo Jima Statues and replicas because they were Southerners?

Will all photos of all Marines from the South in all wars post-1865 be removed from Marine Corps bases where they are on exhibit?

When I walked off Parris Island eons ago there was something special about the fresh memories. Among them were the mean-as-hell drill instructors who had made Marines out of not much more than little boys. Marine Corps boot camp is an experience never to be forgotten if you’ve: “been there done that.” But hopefully never to do again—whew!

But it is not just the memories of those drill instructors who were with recruits 24-7, but with the officers whom the recruits came in contact from time to time. They were special. At least the seemed so. And a Colonel is likely to be the highest-ranking officer a recruit will ever encounter.  But these were men whom you never would doubt taking an order from.

That was a period when the Marines did more in their recruiting than just “hope” for a few good men.

But that was eons ago.

You might also enjoy these articles...