Another Hack Wants to Rewrite History

By January 1, 1970Blog

Tom Steyer has been one of the largest left-wing donors in recent memory. From 2014-2016 alone, he reportedly spent at least $193 million dollars to help push climate change agendas and fund Democratic candidates. In 2018, he also pledged at least $30 million to get Democrats elected with the goal of impeaching Donald Trump.

Steyer also repeatedly runs campaign ads detailing how Donald Trump is a “fraud and a failure” who was only successful because he came from a wealthy family. Interestingly, Tom comes from a very wealthy family, attended prestigious schools, and has donated hundreds of millions to leftist candidates that were even more massive frauds and failures than Donald Trump. Steyer was also implicated in the “Panama Papers” scandal which revealed the lengths that some of these super wealthy elites are willing to go in order to avoid paying taxes on their fortunes.

Reparations have also been a major talking point for Steyer, who said in the February 7th debate, “I am the person on this stage who will say openly, I’m for reparations” because “Something wrong happened.” Steyer then went on to detail how he would completely rewrite American history if he were elected:

“Out of narrative comes policy. And we’re talking about a lot of policies that affect Americans, broadly and disproportionately affect black Americans or brown Americans. But what I believe is we should set up a commission on race and deal with race explicitly. Because everyone’s saying we can’t have rules that are different for different people, but in fact we’re here because we had rules that are different for different people. I would set up a formal commission on race on day one to retell the story of the last 400 years in America of systematic racism against African Americans, not just legal discrimination, injustice, and cruelty, but also the contribution that the African American community has made to America in building it and in leading the entire country from a moral standpoint for generations and centuries. Because I believe out of narrative comes policy. We need to repair damage that’s been done officially, and pretending we’re all the same is not accurate. We got here a certain way. Let’s talk about Jim Crow, let’s talk about Martin Luther King, let’s talk about Barbara Lee, the congresswoman from Oakland who’s one of our great leaders, and then let’s figure out how to repair the damage so we can move forward together.”

What kind of Orwellian, double-speak nonsense is this? So “we’re here” (with record-low black unemployment) because certain people had different rules, but we should just go back to doing that now because some people are still upset and the Democrats need more votes?

Surely taken from the logic of The 1619 Project, the goal of Steyer’s plan is to make race the central theme of American history. Nevermind the fact that the English, Spanish, and Portuguese brought millions of Africans to the Americas. Nevermind the fact that Pope Nicholas V issued a papal bull giving the Portuguese the right to enslave sub-Saharan Africans in 1455. Forget that the first man to own African slaves in Virginia was a black man named Anthony Johnson. Forget that there were free people of color in this country before the Civil War, like South Carolina’s William Ellison, that acquired vast amounts of wealth. Let’s just condemn modern America for the past and make everyone feel ashamed of our history.

When Tom’s logic is broken down, a lot of holes start to appear. If you want to talk about Jim Crow, then let’s be honest and admit it was codified after a decision by mostly Northern Supreme Court judges after the Civil War, while the first segregation laws actually came out of Massachusetts. If you want to talk about Martin Luther King, let’s be honest and admit he wanted the sons of former slaves to come together with sons of former slave owners. King wasn’t going around shaming white people for the past and asking for support with ideas like reparations.

Despite the fact that there are more white people on food stamps than any other race, by a large margin, the left-leaning pundits continue to play the race card in an attempt to build their base. This short-sighted pandering ignores people of various races who worked for generations in America, toiling their lives away in places like coal mines, only to be paid in company scrip. What about the white sharecroppers who worked alongside people of color, and were trapped in an endless cycle of poverty?

Finally, Tom Steyer insists that his miseducation program would focus on the “contribution that the African American community has made to America in building it and in leading the entire country from a moral standpoint for generations and centuries.” A quick look at just about any public education state standards in social studies will show that nearly every unit already has indicators reflecting the importance of the African American contribution. 

Nobody denies the achievements and progress black Americans have made over the course of our history, and nearly every major industry from athletics to entertainment is filled with black success stories. The real goal of Steyer’s plan is not to bring people together. Nothing, especially not some fake federal reserve notes, can undo the past.

Rewriting history would only create more division, agitation, and resentment between Americans. Besides, how does a federal government $23 trillion dollars in debt even get to dictate how they will spend their money at this point? Instead of Americans focusing on our differences and the quibbles of our past, we should be coming together to force the government to take some fiscal responsibility, spend less on perpetual wars, and spend appropriately on programs that actually uplift ALL of our people.


Michael Martin

Michael Martin is a teacher, writer, and historian with experience working in both public and private schools. He currently resides in Charleston, South Carolina with his wife and daughter, where he specializes in early Virginia history, genealogy, and the emerging field of sensory history.

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