Ukrainian Dixie Flag

Ukrainian Dixie Flag

When the fascist regime ruling Ukraine banned the use of the Russian language, arrested Ukrainians with dual Russian citizenship, and tore down Russian war memorials to the liberation of Ukraine from Nazi occupation, Crimea, a semi-autonomous region of eastern Ukraine, voted to secede from the Soviet state onto which she had been grafted in 1954 and return to her Russian motherland of 300 years.

Shortly afterwards, other eastern provinces successfully declared their independence from Ukraine and formed the confederation of “Novorossia” (New Russia). As its banner, Novorossia adopted an adaptation of the Confederate battle flag, or the “Ukrainian Dixie flag” – a starless version of the St. Andrew’s Cross. “There are a few key components that make a Ukrainian separatist,” according to the Moscow Times, “among them Kalashnikov rifles, Cossack hats, golden crosses around their necks, America-bashing, orange-and-black ‘World War II’ ribbons…and Dixie flags.”

Naturally, the U.S. government, which was behind the violent and undemocratic regime change in Kiev in the first place and to which the Confederate flag is like a cross to a vampire, does not recognize these secessionist provinces. In an apparent repudiation of the inalienable right of self-government on which America was founded, the Obama Administration demands that the union in Kiev be preserved at all costs. Despite being ceaselessly trodden upon in its own homeland, the Confederate flag has become a worldwide symbol of liberty and independence. Confederate flags were waving at the downfall of the Berlin Wall and the dissolution of the USSR. One day, perhaps, they will fly again in America.

About James Rutledge Roesch

James Rutledge Roesch lives in Florida. He is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution, the Sons of Confederate Veterans, and the Military Order of the Stars and Bars, as well as the author of From Founding Fathers to Fire-Eaters: The Constitutional Doctrine of States' Rights in the Old South. More from James Rutledge Roesch

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